Author Archives: katrinakennett

A scary story

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Considering the Flipped Classroom

Daynah’s demonstration today is on the flipped classroom.

She has asked us to consider three mini-lessons we would teach during a writing unit.

Here are mine (first, some context: this is a informational writing unit):

  1. collecting mentor texts and explaining why they are good and bad examples
  2. strong hook / tying together into conclusion
  3. revising for flow in sentences

 

here’s some rabble-rousing I did during the presentation:

 

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writing for my dystopia!

Argument: Language shapes the way we think about and understand the world.

Show in this piece: that structuring language in specific ways reduces ‘learning’ to specific set of measured criteria

Background: ‘they’ have standardized English and have taken out the letter W from the language


Information about Exam 1: Exam 1 is usually taken after your second full year in The University. It measures your ability to read, comprehend, and respond to an informational text on a general-information topic. Your translation is going to be compared against benchmark responses and measure your accuracy and fluency. 

Instructions for Exam 1: 

This exam is the first of three formal exams required for successful completion of your degree as granted by The University. It assesses your ability to read a historical text in the Original English, comprehend its main point, and translate misspellings and unclear vocabulary into Standard English. The genre is informational text and its content is meant to assess your general ability at this stage in your learning. Failure to attain proficient status or higher entails re-taking the exam in one year’s time.

Information about Exam 2: This exam is usually taken after your fourth full year in The University It measures your ability to read, comprehend, and respond to an informational text in your Domain Area. Your translation is going to be compared against benchmark scores 

Instructions for Exam 2: 

This exam is the second of three formal exams that your successful completion of a degree from The University. It assesses your ability to read a historical text in the Original English, comprehend its main point, and translate misspellings, unclear vocabulary, and authorial craft into Standard English. It is an informational text in your specialized content area and is meant to assess your readiness for the next level of education. Failure to attain proficient status or higher entails re-taking the exam in one year’s time.

Information about Exam 3:

Instructions for Exam 3: 

This exam is the second of three formal exams that your successful completion of a degree from The University.

Tuesday morning

Everything was conspiring to get me up this morning. I woke up around 4am to shut the windows to the torrential flood pouring from the sky. Then I woke up at 5:40 and was wide awake – I even got up and fed the cats. But then decided I would go back to bed for an hour or so. Half an hour later, the cats made it clear they wanted none of it (they seem to think we should eat breakfast together?) and “helped” me awake by scratching in the litter box and jumping on the bed. Between that and my 9-minute snooze button, I don’t know why I didn’t just stay awake earlier.

BUT, in one of those half-awake, in-between spaces, my research topic came to me.

In a complete sentence.

I study how teachers use digital platforms to support student composing practices.

(insert harmonious chords sung by a large chorus).

When I got up, I went for a run. Well, half walk half run. But the rain was perfect. While I was out, I tinkered with some more versions of my topic:

– I study how teachers support student composing practices with digital tools

– I study how teachers support student composing practices with digital platforms and social technologies.

– I study how teachers support students’ literate practices with digital platforms and social technologies.

See, I know that technologies are inherently social, but I want to be able to study what happens offline (and technologies as more than digital tools)

It’s more of a clear path than I had.

Current Reading 

Anyway, reading yesterday some of Dewey’s Experience and Education – super good, and so pertinent. The opening he was characterizing traditional education as a top-down and outside-in paradigm of what learning is. Progressive education, in dismantling that, must struggle to also figure out how to not throw out the value of learning from a body of knowledge and those older and more experienced. I’m looking forward to reading more of it.

This morning on the bus I was reading some of Tufte’s Envisioning Information – hoping to think about visual representations of information, data, and how design plays a role in creating time and experience of information.

 

 

Reflection on Monday, June 13th

How I feel today 

The word I shared with the group was ‘anxiety plate’ – it was from today when Ellen said she didn’t want to make us anxious by putting too much on our plates. I laughed and drew the following:

My plate is much more full than this one.

A more direct reflection 

So far the writing in UIWP has called upon publishing writing in a different way than I usually do it. I rarely ever put up half-finished posts, because they are often for a specific audience. I do a ton of process writing for myself, and often present it in conversation with others, but don’t let the interweb see my process writing. So many posts in so few days – quite the experience!

I did notice that today I had to get back to a more solitary place – this is such a good group, but I have definitely gotten into a writing and life routine that doesn’t involve so many people all of the time. I’ve noticed I’m taking more lunches by myself to relax, and I’m currently sitting with my headphones on so I can focus to write this. Lots going on for a Monday!

Good – all of it – but a lot.

ksk

eBook ideas

Alright, so back we are to eBook ideas.

Goals: 

– create a resource for teachers (and for broader audiences) about graphic organizers

– include graphic organizers I have used and the ‘thinking behind them’

– talk about how they make sense of the world in one way – and how can they be generative for students (and not just instrumental / something to “get done”)

 

Areas to look for Resources / Research 

– graphic organizers (esp. research on concept maps)

– remediation

– Haberman – Pedagogy of Poverty

– Winn & Johnson Writing Instruction for the Culturally Relevant Classroom

– Tufte – on the visual representation of information

 

Tools

– iBooks Author

 

Done today:

– found Haberman article

– made iBooks frame and started

– emailed Kristina to see if she had readings / guidance

Literacy Narrative

I liked this project for the multiple purposes it served. I had to compose a narrative, get to know someone in the program, and present to an authentic audience. I was able to take the structure of the project and play within it, and at the same time show off a very cool lady I’m spending lots of time with in these next two weeks.

The only difficult part I had was ensuring good audio with the shots that I wanted to take. I wanted to capture Breanne’s ‘return to UIUC’ and so it was important to film in places that she used to be in. The shots around the English building, seeing the new atrium, poking around her old classroom – they were all important to establish sense of place, but the audio on my iPad wasn’t as sophisticated to always catch her voice (even with the tweaking I wanted to do).

It was quite powerful to listen to Breanne talk about her successes, how she achieved them, and also about the vulnerability she had about coming back to writing. I think of the ways I avoid putting my writing ‘out there’ sometimes, and how I drag my heels even for myself.

In my classroom this fall, I might ask my students to consider how their own literacy narratives might impact their own assumptions about their classes. It’s so important to recognize the ways we make sense of the world, and how that shapes not only what we do, and how we do it.